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Our mission is to provide healthcare professionals with unbiased clinical research information, easily.

Currently, you can access the following clinical trials being conducted worldwide:

342,868 studies
in
216 countries
Clinical trial information and results are updated daily from ClinicalTrials.gov. The latest data update was conducted on 08/05/2020.
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Drug Interventions

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Clinical trial information and results are updated daily from ClinicalTrials.gov. The latest data update was conducted on 08/05/2020.
Displaying: 10,478 trials in your specialties ()
View trials across your selected specialties

Genetic Variants and Oxidative Stress as Links Between Periodontitis and Metabolic Syndrome

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Metabolic Syndrome, Periodontitis, Adult
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Other: Observational study (no intervention)

Eligibility
  • Ages: 18 to 75 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

University of Catania, Catania, Italy

Brief Summary

The aim of this study is to investigate the systemic impact of periodontitis in patients with Metabolic Syndrome, by assessing measures of sub-clinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk, microbial factors and host genetic variants, and to study the possible effect of mediators of inflammation and oxidative stress as links between the two conditions.

Psychosocial Adjustment of Adolescents With Spina Bifida

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Spina Bifida
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Not provided

Eligibility
  • Ages: 8 to 15 Years (Child)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
Locations

Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

Brief Summary

The purpose of this longitudinal study is to evaluate a developmentally-oriented bio-neuropsychological model of adjustment in youth and young adults with spina bifida. The theoretical framework for the study is a developmentally-oriented bio-neuropsychosocial model of psychological adjustment.

Fitmore Versus CLS Stem in Total Hip Arthroplasty. Bilateral One-stage Operations

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Primary Hip Osteoarthritis, Surgical Treatment, Secondary Hip Ost...
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Device: Total hip arthroplasty (Fitmore or CLS uncemented femoral stem made by Zimmer-Biomet, Warshaw, USA)

Eligibility
  • Ages: 35 to 75 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
Locations

Brief Summary

Main question: Will use of a stem design that allows anatomical reconstruction of the hip joint improve the outcome in terms of hip function and patient satisfaction without causing any adverse effects? Background: Total hip arthroplasty with use of the most well documented implants is a safe and cost-effective procedure. In the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty register the CLS stem has a 16 years implant survival of 97, 5 %. It is a classic design which requires resection of most of the neck. The stem also intrudes into the greater trochanter which in patients with certain types of proximal hip anatomy makes proper introduction of the stem difficult. Finally it has a standard stem length which will jeopardise future stem removal should there occur any late infection or instability problems. Short uncemented stems have been introduced to enable a more anatomic reconstruction of the hip joint and to cause less invasion of the femoral canal to facilitate future revision should it be necessary. A more conservative resection of neck could also be of value to improve the clinical outcome by improved hip function and patient satisfaction. Purpose of the present study and design: In a prospective study the clinical outcome, stem fixation and bone remodelling around a short stem (Fitmore) will be studied. The main focus will be to evaluate patient reported outcomes especially concerning function, over all satisfaction, pain and activity. All patients will receive the same cup (Trilogy). This cup is chosen because it has a very thorough documentation in prospective RSA studies and in the Swedish hip arthroplasty register. All cups will be supplied with insert made of high molecular polyethylene (Longevity). Number of hips in the study: 44 consecutive cases

Exergaming in Advanced HF With Multiple Chronic Conditions Prior to LVAD Implantation or Heart Transplant

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Heart-Assist Devices, Heart Failure NYHA Class IV, Exercise Training
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Behavioral: PREHAB

Eligibility
  • Ages: 19 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
Locations

University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States

Brief Summary

The purpose of this study is to test a home-based exergaming intervention designed to decrease frailty and fatigue and improve affective well-being, functional capacity, and immune function in individuals with advanced heart failure (HF) and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) prior to receiving either a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Prior to surgery, individuals with advanced HF/MCC experience a high symptom burden that often precludes them from participating in meaningful physical activity. Pre-surgical fitness programs have been used in other critically ill populations to improve function prior to surgery. Interactive gaming systems have been successfully used to engage other seriously ill adults in low-intensity physical activity. However, exergaming interventions have not yet been applied in individuals with advanced HF/MCC as prehabilitation prior to LVAD implantation or OHT. The investigators propose that a prehabilitation exergaming intervention will not only enhance pre-surgical outcomes but will also augment postoperative outcomes. This study is designed in two-phases. Phase 1 examines intervention feasibility and phase 2 is a pilot study with a two-group design. In phase 2, participants will be randomized to a usual care group or the exergaming intervention group. The exergaming group will participate in a low-intensity exergaming intervention and additional investigator-developed educational modules that will be delivered via the Nintendo Wii U exergaming system. The investigators will evaluate pre- and post-surgical frailty, fatigue, affective well-being, and immune function as primary outcomes. The investigators expect that participation in low intensity exergaming will improve these primary outcomes pre- and post-surgically, and decrease post-surgical complications and health care utilization. Investigator-developed modules will promote self-efficacy, self-regulation, and activation. This is the first study to apply low-intensity exergaming to a pre-operative advanced HF/MCC population. The successful application of this intervention has significant implications to the pre-operative conditioning of individuals with advanced HF/MCC prior to LVAD implantation or OHT.

Pulmonary Outcomes of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Young Adulthood

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Premature Birth, Obstructive Lung Disease, Bronchopulmonary Dyspl...
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Not provided

Eligibility
  • Ages: 20 to 29 Years (Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: Yes
Locations

Brief Summary

Preterm birth alters the normal sequence of lung development with lasting respiratory consequences. It is still unclear whether observed respiratory morbidities in preterm born individuals reflect sequelae from a non-progressive lung disease that occurred early in life or result from ongoing active disease that, if left undiagnosed and untreated, could increase the risk of a COPD-like phenotype. We propose to examine micro-structural abnormalities of the lung using innovative non-invasive imaging technologies in relation to pulmonary function and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in young adults born preterm.

Active Ageing and Health

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Chronic Disease, Cognitive Decline, Quality of Life, Physical Act...
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Other: Mild-to-moderate physical activity, Other: Cultural group program

Eligibility
  • Ages: 65 Years and older (Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: Yes
Locations

Centro Obesità, AOU Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy

Brief Summary

Background: 36% of the Italian population will have more than 65 years in 2050. The European Union has indicated among its priorities to increase research on active aging. Physical activity contrasts disability linked to chronic diseases, has positive effects on the quality of life and on biological rhythms, prevents the decline of motor functions, improves the immune response, and prevents / positively affects metabolic disorders. It also provides valuable support in coping with cognitive decline and memory, and acts on depressive symptomatology. The literature on active aging is based, to date, on studies with small samples, rarely conducted with a randomized controlled method, whose outcomes often appear contradictory. The multidisciplinary project the investigators propose is an opportunity to address the issues mentioned above and to acquire further knowledge in the field of active aging. Objectives: the main objective of the study is to evaluate the effects of mild-to-moderate physical activity in a sample of over-65 years-old persons, on Quality of Life, and on biomechanical parameters (static-dynamic balance, mobility). The secondary objectives are aimed at assessing whether a protocol of mild-to-moderate physical activity can improve: - Metabolic functions - Cognitive performance - Perception of pain - Social rhythms and psychological wellbeing - Inflammatory state Design: randomized controlled trial (RCT), single-blinded, with follow-up. Sample: participants will be ≥ 65 years old, of both genders, sedentary, enrolled in two arms through a random assignment (treatment/control) with ratio of 1:1, as following: - about 60 subjects who will carry out a light-to-moderate physical activity intervention (experimental group); - about 60 subjects in the control group, who will participate in group cultural activities (active comparison group). Assessment: the assessment will include socio-demographic variables; variables of psychophysical wellbeing; cognitive variables; variables related to physical health; biomechanical variables; assessment of skin integrity; lab tests on blood samples. Times of evaluations: both groups will be subjected to the measurements of the present study according to the following schedule: - T0 (baseline): before the start of the intervention - T1: 12 weeks after T0 (at the end of the intervention) - T2: after 20 weeks from T0 (follow up 1) - T3: 48 weeks after T0 (follow-up 2).

Activity and Balanced Eating to Reduce Comorbidities and Symptoms of MS

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Multiple Sclerosis
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Behavioral: Behavioral Intervention for Physical Activity in Multiple Sclerosis (BIPAMS), Behavioral: BIPAMS + Diet

Eligibility
  • Ages: 18 to 65 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
Locations

Lakeshore Foundation, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

Brief Summary

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the leading cause of irreversible neurological disability among young women and the second leading cause of disability among young men in the U.S. Cardiometabolic risk factors including obesity and hyperlipidemia are common among people with MS, and these risk factors are associated with severity and frequency of MS relapses and disease progression. People with MS often experience symptoms of pain, fatigue, and depression, which make adhering to a healthy lifestyle difficult, as evidenced by the high rates of unhealthy behaviors including poor diet and physical inactivity among this group. Physical activity has reduced symptoms of MS and improved metabolic risk profiles, but little research has focused on the role of a dietary intervention combined with physical activity in this group. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of a combined diet and physical activity intervention for reducing cardiometabolic risks and MS symptoms when compared to a physical activity intervention alone.

Effects of Spinal Cord Injury Exercise Guidelines

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Chronic Pain, Spinal Cord Injuries
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Other: Exercise, Other: Control

Eligibility
  • Ages: 18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: Yes
Locations

University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

Brief Summary

Over 85,000 Canadians live with a spinal cord injury (SCI). The vast majority experience chronic pain from neuropathic or musculoskeletal origins, with many reporting the pain to be more physically, psychologically and socially debilitating than the injury itself. Currently, pharmaceuticals are the front line treatment recommendation for SCI pain, despite having many side-effects and giving minimal relief. Alternatively, studies conducted in controlled lab and clinical settings suggest that exercise may be a safe, effective behavioural strategy for reducing SCI-related chronic pain. Two ways in which exercise may alleviate pain are by reducing inflammation and increasing descending inhibitory control. To date, no study has tested the effects of exercise, performed in a home-/community-setting, on chronic pain in adults with SCI. Furthermore, information on the exercise dose required to alleviate chronic SCI pain is virtually non-existent, making it impossible for clinicians and fitness trainers to make evidence- informed recommendations regarding the types and amounts of exercise to perform in order to manage SCI pain. Recently (2018), an international team published two scientific SCI exercise guidelines: one to improve fitness and one to improve cardiometabolic health. These scientific guidelines have been translated into Canadian community SCI exercise guidelines and provide the exercise prescription for the proposed study. The investigators' overarching research question is: can home-/community-based exercise—prescribed according to these new SCI exercise guidelines and supported through a theory-based behavioural intervention— significantly reduce chronic pain in adults with SCI?

Analysis of Sleep Study Data to Assess Depressive Burden

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Sleep Disorder, Depressive; Behavioral Disorder, Mood Disorders
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Device: MEB-001

Eligibility
  • Ages: 18 to 75 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No
Locations

Lakeland Sleep and CPAP, Plymouth, Minnesota, United States

Brief Summary

This study evaluates the effectiveness of the MEB-001 device in assessing physiological parameters that provide a clinically significant depressive burden screener. This study uses objective physiological markers from MEB-001 to estimate the clinically significant depressive burden as subjectively reported by the subject with the Beck Depression Inventory - II (BDI-II).

Comparative Study of Three Common Bile Duct Closure Techniques

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    N/A
  • Condition
    Common Bile Duct Closure
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Procedure: T tube drainage, Procedure: Primary closure, Procedure: Antegrade stenting

Eligibility
  • Ages: 20 to 80 Years (Adult, Older Adult)
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers: Yes
Locations

South Valley University, Sohag, Qena, Egypt

Brief Summary

this study evaluate the efficacy and safety of three different methods of CBD repair and provide more evidence for selecting the optimal duct closure after choledocholithotomy.