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Our mission is to provide healthcare professionals with unbiased clinical research information, easily.

Currently, you can access the following clinical trials being conducted worldwide:

354,475 studies
in
216 countries
Clinical trial information and results are updated daily from ClinicalTrials.gov. The latest data update was conducted on 12/02/2020.
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Drug Interventions

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Clinical trial information and results are updated daily from ClinicalTrials.gov. The latest data update was conducted on 12/02/2020.
Displaying: 1,967 trials in your specialties ()
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Autologous Transplant for Multiple Myeloma

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 2 Phase 3
  • Condition
    Multiple Myeloma
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Procedure: Stem Cell Transplant, Drug: Cyclophosphamide + Mesna, Drug: Melphalan, Biological: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States

Brief Summary

This is a study of a regimen of melphalan and autologous stem cells for patients with multiple myeloma. We hypothesize that this particular regimen will improve the survival of these patients.

The Dose of Radioactive Iodine Needed to Ablate the Thyroid Remnant Left Behind After Thyroidectomy

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Thyroid Neoplasms
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Drug: Radioactive iodine

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Oncology, Helsinki, Finland

Brief Summary

The thyroid cells take up iodine, and radioactive iodine is commonly used to irradiate residual thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer following surgical removal of the thyroid gland (thyroidectomy). A whole body radioactive iodine scanning is usually carried out after thyroidectomy to assess the amount of thyroid tissue left behind at surgery (that might still contain cancer), and to evaluate the presence of iodine avid lesions elsewhere in the body (that might be cancer metastases). A large dose of radioactive iodine is often given, still the optimal iodine dose to ablate the thyroid remnant after surgery is not known. In this study, two radioactive iodine doses are compared in the ablation of the thyroid remnant, a smaller (1110 MBq) dose and a larger (3700 MBq) dose. The study participants are randomly allocated using a 1:1 ratio to receive either the smaller or the larger radioactive iodine dose. These treatments are compared for safety, adverse effects, and the need for subsequent repeat treatments. The individual absorbed radiation doses are measured. The study hypothesis is that fewer repeat radioiodine treatments might be needed after the larger dose, but the larger dose might be associated with a higher frequency of adverse events.

Radiation Therapy, Amifostine, and Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Nasopharyngeal Cancer

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx, Stage I Squamous Ce...
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Drug: amifostine trihydrate, Drug: fluorouracil, Drug: cisplatin, Other: laboratory biomarker analysis, Radiation: radiation therapy

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

Brief Summary

This phase III trial is studying how well radiation therapy, amifostine, and chemotherapy work in treating young patients with newly diagnosed nasopharyngeal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs, such as amifostine, may protect normal cells from the side effects of radiation therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving radiation therapy together with amifostine and chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.

Corneal Collagen Crosslinking for Progressive Keratoconus and Ectasia Using Riboflavin/Dextran and Hypotonic Riboflavin

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Keratoconus, Corneal Ectasia
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Drug: Riboflavin/Dextran, Drug: Hypotonic Riboflavin

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Cornea and Laser Eye Institute, Teaneck, New Jersey, United States

Brief Summary

Corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) has been proposed as an effective method of reducing progression of both keratoconus and corneal ectasia after surgery, as well as possibly decreasing the steepness of the cornea in these pathologies. During the CXL procedure, the central corneal thickness has been shown to significantly change. The investigator's believe that better maintenance of corneal thickness potentially could have benefits of better reproducibility of the crosslinking effect with improved predictability of results.

Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Ann...
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Drug: Cyclophosphamide, Drug: Cytarabine, Drug: Dexamethasone, Drug: Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Other: Laboratory Biomarker Analysis, Drug: Leucovorin Calcium, Drug: Mercaptopurine, Drug: Methotrexate, Drug: Pegaspargase, Other: Quality-of-Life Assessment, Other: Questionnaire Administration, Drug: Thioguanine, Drug: Vincristine Sulfate

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Children's Hospital of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

Brief Summary

This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

Clofarabine or High-Dose Cytarabine and Pegaspargase in Children With ALL

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 2 Phase 3
  • Condition
    Leukemia
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Drug: Amsacrine, Drug: Clofarabine, Drug: Cyclophosphamide, Drug: Cytarabine, Drug: Daunorubicin hydrochloride, Drug: Dexamethasone, Drug: Doxorubicin hydrochloride, Drug: Etoposide phosphate, Drug: Mercaptopurine, Drug: Methotrexate, Drug: Methylprednisolone, Drug: Pegaspargase, Drug: Thioguanine, Drug: Vincristine sulfate, Radiation: Whole-brain radiation therapy

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Krankenanstalten Gilead gCmbH Neurochirurgische Klinik, Bielefeld, Germany

Brief Summary

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than once drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. It is not yet known whether giving clofarabine or high-dose cytarabine, pegaspargase, and combination chemotherapy followed by daunorubicin hydrochloride or doxorubicin hydrochloride is more effective in treating young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized phase II/III trial is studying the side effects of giving clofarabine compared with giving high-dose cytarabine, pegaspargase, and combination chemotherapy followed by daunorubicin hydrochloride or doxorubicin hydrochloride and to see how well it works in treating young patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Efficacy and Safety Study of Leukocyte Interleukin,Injection (LI) to Treat Cancer of the Oral Cavity

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity, Squamous Cell Carcino...
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Biological: LI, Drug: Cyclophosphamide, Drug: Indomethacin, Dietary Supplement: Zinc, Procedure: Surgery, Drug: Cisplatin, Radiation: Radiotherapy

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

National Tumor Institute of Italy, Naples, Italy

Brief Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine whether LI administered in combination with cyclophosphamide, indomethacin and zinc (CIZ) in a multivitamin combination prior to standard of care therapy (surgery followed by radiotherapy or concurrent radiochemotherapy) is safe and will increase the overall survival of subjects with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or soft palate at a median of 3 years

Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Head and Neck Cancer, Precancerous Condition
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Biological: cetuximab, Drug: cisplatin, Radiation: IMRT

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Providence Cancer Center, Anchorage, Alaska, United States

Brief Summary

RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective with cisplatin or cetuximab in treating oropharyngeal cancer. PURPOSE: This phase III trial is studying radiation therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab to see how well it works in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

The Efficacy and Safety of BAT8001 Injection for the Treatment of HER2-positive Advanced Breast Cancer

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    HER2-positive Advanced Breast Cancer
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Biological: BAT8001 for injection, Drug: Lapatinib, Drug: Capecitabine

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

Shenzhen People's Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China

Brief Summary

To evaluate the safety and efficacy of BAT8001 for the treatment of HER2-positive advanced breast cancer, using lapatinib in combination with capecitabine as the positive control drug.

PREvention of STroke in Intracerebral haemorrhaGE Survivors With Atrial Fibrillation

  • Status
    Active, not recruiting
  • Phase
    Phase 3
  • Condition
    Atrial Fibrillation, Intracerebral Hemorrhage
View Full Trial
INTERVENTION

Drug: Apixaban Oral Tablet, Drug: Dabigatran, Drug: Edoxaban Tablets, Drug: Rivaroxaban

Eligibility
  • Ages:
  • Sexes: All
  • Accepts Healthy Volunteers:
Locations

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, Ashford, United Kingdom

Brief Summary

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common form of irregular heart rhythm. In people with AF, blood clots often form in the heart, which can travel to the brain. Blockage of brain arteries by these clots is a major cause of stroke. This type of stroke is called an ischaemic stroke and approximately 15% of all ischaemic strokes are caused by AF. People with AF are often prescribed a medication called an anticoagulant, which makes it less likely for blood clots to form and thus can prevent ischaemic strokes. However, anticoagulants also increase the risk of bleeding, so they are not suitable for everyone. Some people who have AF have had a different type of stroke which is caused by bleeding in the brain, an intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). These people are at increased risk of suffering both an ischaemic stroke (due to AF) and another ICH. It is not known whether it is best for these people to take an anticoagulant medication or not, as previous research studies did not include this group of people. PREvention of STroke in Intracerebral haemorrhaGE survivors with Atrial Fibrillation (PRESTIGE-AF) is a research study on the best stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation (AF) who have recently had a bleeding in their brain, (ICH). This is a trial where half of the participants will take an anticoagulant medication, preventing blood clot formation, and half will not receive an anticoagulant. The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) that will be used in this trial are all licenced for use in the United Kingdom and within the European Union (EU) to prevent strokes in people with AF. However, the current licence does not extend to use with people who have had an ICH because it has not been tested in this group with a randomised controlled trial. DOACs will be tested in ICH survivors with AF because previous research trials have shown that people are up to 50% less likely to have bleeding complications in the brain with DOACs than with Warfarin (another commonly used anticoagulant). The aim of PRESTIGE-AF is to answer the question of whether people with ICH and AF should take an anticoagulant medication or if it is better for them to avoid it.